Adaptive Growth is a boutique consulting firm. However, we are not a consulting firm in the traditional sense because we are not about creating client dependencies on billable hours.

We developed and license an approach companies do themselves to describe and document how their business operates and works—business transaction by business transaction. The product can be used for projects such as, enterprise software evaluation, acquisition and implementation (our focus), developing business process improvement strategies, new market development, product design, or improving a company’s day-to-day operational life but is not restricted to them. The results of doing the work required from our approach can be stored in a reusable and maintainable database that saves companies’ time, resources and thousands of dollars in future projects.

People who don’t understand how your business works can’t deliver the tools you need to run it.

When we at Adaptive Growth say (as we often do) that most companies don’t really understand themselves, what we mean is that they can rarely describe themselves in terms that will give software technology providers an accurate picture of how a new software system will be expected to fit into their company as a whole. Until a company learns how to do that, the usability and fitness of the software it acquires will tend to be hit or miss.

It should be noted that our website is focused on enterprise software acquisition and implementation projects. However, the work of completing our approach to how a business operates and works can be used for projects such as: improving a company’s business processes, re-engineering, product design or to improve a company’s day-to-day operations, but is not restricted to them.

Usability and fitness of the software that companies acquire is usually hit or miss 

  • Companies usually don’t know what they are asking for when they set out to acquire a new piece of business software. The result is projects exceed their budget and expected completion dates by 20% to 200%.
  • Companies historically don’t dedicate the resources and the time (like they do for anything else they might make or buy) to describe and document how their business operates and works before they initiate an enterprise software acquisition and implementation project, or contact a consulting firm or software vendor.
  • Without a document that describes how the business works, business transaction by business transaction, it’s almost impossible for a company to know precisely the business requirements a software system must have or allowed to be done if their business is to run as it should.
  • Buyers of software technology, especially enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, intentionally turn control of the buying process over to sellers (consultants, software vendors or solution providers). And that happens because buyers believe software technology and how it should work for their company is beyond their capabilities and scope.

The traditional software buying process is a root cause of failure

Software acquisition and implementation projects, especially ERP, fail because companies continue to use a buying process that is over forty-five years old. The traditional buying process is usually based on a request for proposal (RFP) that companies prepare themselves or it is prepared by a consulting firm. Almost all RFP’s describe the functionality a software system must have if the business is to run as it should versus the business requirements a software system must have or allow to be done if the business is to run as it should. Thus project failures can almost always be expressed in terms of unmet but critical user expectations of one kind or another.