Is it true that most ERP implementation failures can be traced back to one critical mistake – bad software selection?

In an article I read last year the author stated that “most ERP implementation failures can be traced back to one critical mistake – bad software selection.” It went on to say; “the pattern is horribly familiar: a surprisingly difficult implementation, immediate complaints from users, followed by the sickening realization that the ERP solution did not deliver as promised. What followed was predictable. Months of frantic redevelopment, spiraling costs and, very often, a messy and expensive legal battle with a software vendor. For an organization, a bad ERP software selection can severely damage strategic advantage.”

 

I would agree with this statement from the perspective that most software selections are usually based on functional requirements. Functional requirements described in the context of the functionality a software system must have if a business is to run as it should. This happens because companies don’t make the effort or take the time to describe and document the project’s critical expectations as business requirements in all its phases before an ERP acquisition and implementation project is initiated. We contend that happens because most company’s never committed the resources and time to describe and document how their business operates and store those results in a reusable and maintainable database.